Wordle

Today’s Wordle Word Of The Day is Answer, Hint and Clues, which was posted on August 11th.

Holy moly guacamole, the first day of school has come and gone and it went better than expected. My 15-year-old started a new high school in 10th grade this year which was pretty intimidating but I think she’ll do great. I’m just enjoying the fact that I have some kid-free time to work in the day. Summer is great and all, but I’ve come to believe that year-round school is a better option for kids, teachers and parents.

There are problems associated with summer break, and some distinct advantages to year-round schooling.

The Problems of Summer Break

It can be difficult for working parents to stay home with their children, who then spend money on summer camps, daycare and other expenses. In a system in which school took more frequent breaks throughout the year rather than just one long one over summer, at least these costs would be spread out. Students would also forget a lot of what they learned during their previous year of school over such a long summer break—studies have found that students can forget anywhere from 17% to 34% of what they learned during each semester. This is clearly not ideal for anyone involved.

Other studies have shown that summer break exacerbates income gaps and inequality, with lower-income students falling further behind during the summer. The reason is obvious: Families with less money and financial resources will have a harder time getting their kids involved with camps or summer activities or travel. And having extra days in school can make a big difference for kids who get many of their meals there (and might not at home).

The Benefits of a Balanced Calendar

In the meantime, there are advantages to spreading out breaks. It means that children and teachers have more frequent opportunities for rest periods during the school year.

School year-round calendars break up the academic year into several medium-sized (two to three weeks) vacations. The length of these breaks and marking periods varies. Some schools have four 45-day sessions followed by 15-day breaks, while others have three 60-day academic sessions followed by 20 days of break. Some extend the school year as well as shift the schedule, sometimes by adding an “intersession” period of a week or two during which students take academic courses that are outside their normal course load. The Congressional Research Service found that the average year-round school is open 189 days per year—nine days longer than the standard 180-day year.

Today’s Wordle: 418 Hint and Answer

Be careful now. Spoilers wait in the shadows up ahead and down yonder trail. You have been warned!

The Hint: Gather, slowly.

The Clue: This word has two different vowels in it, and only two.

AUDIO
TANKS
CRANE
GLEAN

The puzzle was fun and challenging. I made an audible exclamation when I got it right, because I really wasn’t expecting to even though I was on my fourth guess already. I rearranged the three letters in my word list to see if I could get any of them in green; lo and behold, the correct answer appeared! My opening word—audio—was very effective in ruling out most of the vowels. Unfortunately, the second vowel I needed was the one vowel not included in this guess. In fact, according to Wordle Bot, I still had a whopping 434 possible solutions remaining—the absolute unluckiest possible outcome for this word. Normally it cuts it down to 183.

I tried to get the ‘A’ into the green with my second guess, tanks, but it was still very yellow. Wordle Bot suggested crest as a better alternative, and it would have gotten me that green ‘E’ had I thought of it at the time. Oh well. I decided to use a crane for guess #3 which got me the ‘E’ in yellow and made me pretty sure that the word I was looking for would end in EAN. It just seemed more likely to end in ‘N’ than in ‘A’ given there was an ‘E’ involved that couldn’t be in the final spot.

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